August 3, 2021

China is banning a Chinese app called “Cloud” for allowing users to share their data with outside companies without permission, a Canadian company said.

Cloud is a Chinese-language app developed by two Canadian developers and available for Android, Apple iOS and Windows Phone.

The app allows users to access personal information and personal data of others in China without a valid identity.

The Chinese government said last week it was investigating the app, which is available for sale in China for between $9.99 and $15.99.

A statement from the Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology said it “does not allow people to share private information without consent from their original source.”

“It is not possible to get a valid consent to share data.” “

A similar Chinese app, “Mash” which uses similar methods, was banned in Canada in March for violating the country’s data protection laws. “

It is not possible to get a valid consent to share data.”

A similar Chinese app, “Mash” which uses similar methods, was banned in Canada in March for violating the country’s data protection laws.

Google, Apple and Microsoft declined to comment on the Chinese crackdown.

“In a move that will make it difficult for anyone to find a new way to access information, China is now banning an app called Cloud,” said Marc Andreessen, co-founder of Andreessen Horowitz, a venture capital firm based in Toronto.

“The Chinese government should reconsider its ban on apps that encourage people to violate data protection rules.”

Cloud, developed by Google and Alibaba, lets users upload images, audio and video to the app.

Google has since removed the app from its app store, while Alibaba has not.

The two companies have had similar app platforms for years.

“Cloud is just another piece of China’s increasingly sophisticated digital infrastructure,” Andreessen said.

“We don’t think it’s fair for Chinese regulators to have this power to block apps that don’t do anything illegal, because China’s law enforcement authorities will likely use this power against developers who don’t toe the line.”

The Chinese governments online censorship measures were the subject of a 2014 report from the International Civil Liberties Information Center, which said China’s internet censorship is the third-highest in the world behind Russia and China.